Acid-Base Homework Problem Set 2

This problem set was developed by S.E. Van Bramer for Chemistry 146 at Widener University.


  1. Calculate the H3O1+ concentration, OH1- concentration, pH, and pOH of the following solutions. First solve assuming that Kw is insignificant. Repeat the calculations and include Kw (you will need to use the quadratic equation to solve these). When is Kw significant?
    1. 1.0 x 10-9 M HNO3
    2. 1.0 x 10-6 M HNO3
    3. 1.0 x 10-3 M HNO3
    4. 1.0 x 10-1 M HNO3
    5. 1.0 M HNO3
    6. 10.0 M HNO3

  2. Calculate the H3O1+ concentration, OH1- concentration, pH, pOH, nitrate ion concentration and sodium ion concentration for the following experimental steps in a titration. Graph your results.
    1. 6 M HNO3.
    2. Pure Deionized Water.
    3. 1.00 mL of the nitric acid is diluted with deionized water to a volume of 100.0 ml.
    4. 5.2468 g of NaOH is dissolved in deionized water to a volume of 1.000 liter.
    5. 0.100 mL of the sodium hydroxide solution is added to the nitric acid solution.
    6. 1.00 mL of the sodium hydroxide solution is added to the nitric acid solution.
    7. 10.00 mL of the sodium hydroxide solution is added to the nitric acid solution.
    8. 20.00 mL of the sodium hydroxide solution is added to the nitric acid solution.
    9. Enough sodium hydroxide solution is added to reach the equivilence point.
    10. 50.00 mL of the sodium hydroxide solution is added to the nitric acid solution.
    11. 100.0 mL of the sodium hydroxide solution is added to the nitric acid solution.

  3. What is the pH and pOH of a buffer prepared by adding 1.2435 g of sodium acetate to 100 mL of 0.124 M acetic acid. Calculate using the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation (as shown in your textbook) and using the quadratic equation (as shown in class).

  4. Determine the pH and pOH of a buffer prepared by adding 0.0100 g of sodium hydroxide to 100 mL of 0.124 M acetic acid. Calculate using the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation (as shown in your textbook), the method of successive approximations, and using the quadratic equation (as shown in class).

  5. Calculate the H3O1+ concentration, OH1- concentration, pH, pOH, acetic acid concentration, and the acetate ion concentration for the following experimental steps in a titration. Calculate using the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation (as shown in your textbook) and using the quadratic equation (as shown in class). Graph your results.
    1. 1.00 mL of glacial acetic acid (pure acetic acid, density 1.0492 g/mL) is diluted with deionized water to a volume of 100.0 ml.
    2. 2.2468 g of NaOH is dissolved in deionized water to a volume of 500 mL.
    3. 0.100 mL of the sodium hydroxide solution is added to the acetic acid solution.
    4. 1.00 mL of the sodium hydroxide solution is added to the acetic acid solution.
    5. 10.00 mL of the sodium hydroxide solution is added to the acetic acid solution.
    6. Enough sodium hydroxide solution is added to reach the equivilence point.
    7. 160.00 mL of the sodium hydroxide solution is added to the acetic acid solution.
    8. 200.0 mL of the sodium hydroxide solution is added to the acetic acid solution.


Please send comments or suggestions to svanbram@science.widener.edu

Scott Van Bramer
Department of Chemistry
Widener University
Chester, PA 19013

© copyright 1996, S.E. Van Bramer
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Last Updated: Saturday, May 18, 1996